You're Not Willing To Win.

There is a version of an old Buddhist phrase that goes something like this: "When the student is willing, the teacher will appear." It's simple -- but quite accurately the biggest problem you have in driving corporate innovation.

You don't see possibility because you're not willing to make mistakes in order to achieve success. You don't see positive change because you're not willing to take a fresh look at your internal motivations.

You're not willing to change.

You can't see around the business problems in your way right now; and so, you stay stuck -- holding onto your title and business silo like defense positions, instead of a periscopes with which to view the future.

Willingness is directly tied to outcomes.

If you're not willing to change, your options for achieving success are extremely limited. Almost impossible.

Before you plan, before you build a new strategy, before you hire the right team members, before you get begin driving change -- you need to get serious about your willingness.

It's a deeply personal discussion.

What are you willing to do in order to get to where you want to be? What are you unwilling to do under any circumstance or condition?

It's important to revisit that discussion on a consistent basis.

If you say you're willing, are you acting like you're willing? Are you doing what it takes even though that is certain to be what is most uncomfortable and unpleasant at times?

If you're not willing to lose money, a few friends, some sleep, the respect of the crowd, or anything else in your journey towards where you want to be then success for you will be a frightfully elusive experience.

You have to be willing to win.

If you find yourself doing a lot of things -- following a lot of steps -- but not getting the results you desperately want, it's your willingness.

That's something that no one else can fix for you. You have to decide what you want and what you're willing to do about that.

Are you willing to win?