Let The One Who Got Away Go Away.

Losing flat out stinks. Whether you are playing cards, chasing a beautiful woman, or trying to close an impossible business deal -- being rejected is disappointing, frustrating, and completely maddening all the same time.

And if you're even half a fighter, you're natural reaction is to dig in your heels and fight back. Fight to win.

That's a good thing.

If you believe in something, you should fight for it. If you want to win, you're going to have to learn how to face rejection and come back swinging.

But you've got to be smart about the battles you chase -- the deals you choose to pursue.

Almost every senior sales executives who has been in business for some time has an epic "big fish tale" about how they achieved success against overwhelming odds. A lot of the time that's downright awesome.

The rest of the time it's just stupid.

It's bad business skills and counter productive thinking.

The truth about problem prospects is that they demand a massive amount of time, money, and emotional energy from you. Instead of landing a dozen smaller clients who could make up the financial gap, one problem prospect will demand all of your time and attention.

It's downright risky too. If they decide to walk away, you're left with a gaping hole in your revenue model.

Sometimes it's smart to let the one who got away go away.

While you get back to work.

That means you probably won't be the one standing around the coffee maker telling stories about that one "impossible deal" that you finally closed, but you'll find yourself achieving realistic revenue growth month after month -- quarter after quarter.

Be bold. Swing for the fences. Don't back down from problem prospects.

Just don't be naive.

Know what you are in for. Be prepared to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes.

That's the only attitude that will give you enough leverage to manage problem prospects. And win.

Otherwise, just let them go.