Success, Marketing, And The Power Of Being An Idiot Sometimes.

One of the secrets to success in life is to master personal relationships. It doesn't matter what you're trying to achieve, it all comes down to the "being human" factor -- how good you are at managing the craziness of people.

Whether you are trying to be a Olympic athlete, get promoted at a new job, launch a winning start-up, or create marketing that connects with valuable prospects -- the key to breaking through the noise is to understand people.

To be a human.

The reason why most marketing doesn't work is that the language and tone of the discussion doesn't work with humans.

That's the same reason why cold calling isn't as effective as it can be sometimes. It's not the process or the tools or the overall strategy.

People who are hurting, and need what you have to offer, are only going to admit their pain and come to you for help if they feel like you understand them.

That's the essence of our primal survival.

Being understood and relevant.

So if your marketing is all about speeds-and-feeds, bells-and-whistles, and "why you're the best" you're just not going to connect in a way that drives massive growth.

  1. Talk about how you screwed up and the lessons you learned from failure.
  2. Share deeply personal but insightful thoughts about the future of your industry.
  3. Talk about real issues in language that other people use.
  4. Drop all the pictures and colors and just focus on 3 to 5 sentences of engaging content.

All of life is a sales pitch.

If you're not selling you and your ideas then you're not getting closer to where you want to be.

Whether you call it influence or marketing or selling or just flat out "doing your thing," you're not going to be good at it if you're not good at understanding and working with the people around you.

You're a human being.

Act like one.

Be an idiot sometimes.

Quit trying to be so fearless and untouchable that people can't imagine you ever having a bad day.

No one likes someone like that. Work on your "being a person" skills.