You're Not Disrupting Anything. You're Interrupting...

The idea of "disruption" has been hijacked by anyone with half a business idea and enough gumption to claim they're going to change the world. It used to be that disruption demanded knowing more about your industry than anyone else. It used to mean that you studied what was going on, analyzed gaps, researched opportunities for transformational growth, and presented a compelling story for change once you had done the hard work of figuring out what the best possible plan might be.

Now, it seems all you need is a big, fat mouth.

You don't need to do any research. You don't need to do any work. You don't need to care about the industry that you're working in. You just need to talk about what you're going to do and why investors should give you money for your big idea.

What happened to being a craftsman? What happened to the days when entrepreneurs didn't work for the "next round", they obsessed over improving a process and bettering a trade for everyone involved?

That's what "disruption" is all about.

Not about billion dollar valuations on paper.

It's about a passionate pursuit of being better. It's about getting people to realize that they can do better.

Disruption is about motivating an industry to believe in themselves a little bit more. To imagine the possibilities of trying something different.

Everything else is just interruption. Its just noise. Uneducated, ambition-less, get-rich-quick nonsense.  It's about time to stop pretending like the annoying interruptions all around you are really "disruption".

It's easy to confuse the interruptions around this as being transformational.

But they pass with this season.

A new start up with a new way to send pictures that automatically self destruct. A new startup with a better way to share your exact location and pictures of last night's dinner. A new startup with a better way to "hook up" with singles on a college campus.

This isn't disruption. This is just an interruption to the noble causes to which we used to aspire.

It's time to grow up. To look up. To expect more from ourselves then fantasy valuations and get-rich-quick technology ideation.

We have to start questioning not just the funding in our bank account but our intentions for making the world a better place.

It's time to stop glamorizing interruptions as applaudable business conquest.

They're really just a waste of all of our time.