Why Your Emails Are So Damn Annoying And What To Do About It.

In the world of email marketing, there's a concept called "sending drip emails".

No one is really sure who actually named the concept that way, but the idea is universally understood -- drip messages on your clients until it's a good time for them to buy from you.

The concept is rooted in a good idea.

Following up with potential customers is a great way to grow your business.

Whether you're in the real estate business or selling loans, building windmills or exporting commodities across continents, there are always people who will do business with you if you follow up with them at the right time in the future.

Right now is a bad time for them.

Maybe it is your pricing or their prior commitments or current priorities. If you can remember to follow up with those prospects when their priorities change or your prices get better ,you dramatically increase your odds for doing business with a prospect.

The idea of "dripping emails" is that you set up a series of emails that automatically gets sent to that prospect on a schedule. Usually that means your prospect gets an email from you automatically every 2 to 3 weeks.

Which is not necessarily a bad idea.

That might be the right amount of time to reengage. It depends upon your prospect's specific buying cycle.

The problem with drip emails is that they are usually boring. And irrelevant. And pretty much a waste of everyone's time.

So instead of following up and staying top of mind, your drip email backfires.  Instead of being helpful you train your prospect that you are a pretty annoying person to do business with.

Which, in any industry, translates into you making less money.

Try sending tips -- not drips. Get to know your prospect well enough that you can send them helpful ideas for ways to grow their business. Ways for them to do better deals. Bigger deals.

Send them tips about what their competitors are doing. Tips about the growth of their industry. Tips about new ideas for leveraging their brand for greater revenue growth.

Most drip email  just annoy the person receiving them.

So stop sending them. All of them. As soon as possible.

Start sending tips. It's hard to find a prospect who won't be delighted when they get that sort of information from you.

Focus on fewer drips. More tips.

 

BusinessStephen Palacino