You Might Just Be Good At The Wrong Thing.

You can do just about anything when you stop making excuses for yourself. It's really that simple.

When you refuse to let yourself take the easy way out, you usually find the right way forward.

It's the only option left.

Think about the silly excuses that get in the way of trying something amazing:

  • "There isn't enough time in the day."  But there is always enough time to do the right thing.
  • "Life isn't fair".  But it is guaranteed to give you back what you put in.
  • "No one's done that before."  But that doesn't mean you can't be first.
  • "It won't make a difference anyway." But you know deep down that isn't the case at all.

It's natural to want to feel good about yourself.  That's how you are wired.  Your brain automatically attempts to provide an explanation for why you are still a winner in spite of losing.

It's a default defensive reaction.

So it takes some proactive thinking and well thought-out activity to change what you do naturally -- lie to yourself.

Whether you are training for the Olympics, working to land a new promotion, or tackling personal life challenges there are few ways to retrain yourself away from making silly excuses.

Here are a few suggestions for you:

  1. Be grateful.  There is something eye-opening about saying "Thank You" often.  You teach yourself the art of empathy.
  2. Take accountability for any failure, no matter how small.  You'll start learning how powerful you are to change your future.
  3. Ask yourself "what could I have done better" and then do it better next time.  You'll be more aware of your ability to achieve at a higher level.
  4. Write out a list of tasks you want to accomplish each day.  You'll stop forgetting small (but important) things and start being more efficient.
  5. Apologize when you make a mistake.  You'll stop shifting blame and start taking responsibility for your actions.  That means progress.

 You get better because you plan to get better.

It's not an accident or the result of luck.  It is purpose that drives high-performance.  Not a series of excuses.

Stop wasting your time on excuses and train your brain to look for ways to make you a superstar.

That's a better use of your creativity.