What You Believe In.

What you do matters. You can't hurt people and then claim it was a mistake. You can't be careless and inconsiderate and then not take responsibility for the results of your behavior.

Actions have consequences.

But actions don't magically happen all by themselves.  Before you ever do something, you think about it.  Even if it's only for the shortest of moments, your brain processes your emotions and any information it has at the time and tells you what you should do.

Which is why what you believe in matters.

Your beliefs guide your decision-making process. And it is almost instantaneous. You can't help yourself. Before you can talk yourself down, your brain is telling your body to do something. And you do it without further thinking, because that's what you believe in.

What you just did wasn't an accident.

This is true if you're a high performer or if you're in underachiever. What you believe in you become.

Sadly, most sales training focuses almost entirely on helping you cultivate a different set of actions. Good actions. Better actions. More effective, more efficient actions.  But still -- just actions.

The reason why the majority of sales training has very little long-term impact, and only slightly better short term impact, is because it does nothing to effect what is most important -- what you believe in.

So after the training is done and you attempt to follow the new, more effective process, your results are painfully limited. The problem isn't really the training or the process; it is your beliefs. That's the problem.

You don't believe that you're a winner.

That you are worth it. That at the end of the day success is something that you want to achieve.

And since you don't believe in you no process or trainer or magic formula will ever make you a superstar. You believe otherwise.

That's rather sad, considering how much you have going for you.

If you won't to believe in you, what else is there to believe in?

AttitudeStephen Palacino