Stop Throwing Your Dirt Around.

Just because you're digging out doesn't mean that you need to throw dirt. It's natural to be frantic when you feel your world falling in around you.

As each step takes you closer to (what you think is) your demise every part of your brain screams out for you to survive.  So you pick up your shovel and start digging -- shoveling your way out of trouble step by step by step.

But as your head is down and your back is bent you probably don't notice what you're doing to everyone around you.

You've just shoveled your dirt all over them.

Call it collateral damage. Call it an accident.  It doesn't really matter how you excuse away the behavior, other people get dirty. Because you just took your problems and threw them around on anyone standing close by.

And you hate it when other people do that to you.

So what can you do?

You have a problem.  You are struggling to survive.

But shoveling dirt doesn't need to be your way of handling your panic.

  1. Stop being frantic.  Take a moment to let your life experience over-ride your delusion and worry.  Pause.
  2. Watch where you throw your problems.  Adding chaos to other people's lives just creates more problems for you later.
  3. Apologize when you hurt other people.  Build bridges.  Don't dig holes.
  4. Use the dirt as a stepping-stone. Step up one careful solution at a time.  Build a path to freedom.
  5. Don't get in the hole in the first place.  It's the little divots that turn into cemetery plots.  Remember that the details matter right now.

We all have problems.

You are never going to be in a position where problems don't make you think that you might not make it this time.  Where survival doesn't automatically kick  in.

So as you grab your shovel and start frantically throwing dirt everywhere, remember that the only way out of your hole is to shovel dirt beneath your feet.

Anywhere else just makes your problems deeper.